Morjella

The Magazine for Sufferers of Morg, Lyme and More
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Bugstory – Part 2

November 30, 2011 By: kajay Category: F-Zymes, Featured, Morgellons

Europe in the middle ages and later had no DDT and precious little water. What they did have a lot of, in addition to a serious problem with body odor, was lice. always, the wealthy could afford to use various methods to stop the lice from the means to devise and use means of thwarting the lice. Consider these techniques, which didn’t work completely, but must have worked pretty well because some looked so ridiculous I cannot imagine people used them simply for fashion. But then, fashion can get pretty strange, as any trip through a “costumes through the ages” book will show:

Powdered Wigs

Now this is just my theory, based on my own experience with crawling things. What if rich people shaved their heads and wore wigs and powdered them to discourage lice? Possible? I think so. For those who still wear ceremonial wigs, such as barristers and judges in Great Britain, this is probably coming in handy now, with the resurgence of lice infestations.

Ruched Collars

From one 1800’s article we know that at least one person documented that bed bugs traveled to the ceiling and dropped down upon them at night. This is one of many things I have learned that substantiated what many of us have experienced and others disbelieved.

And ruffled and ruched collars, such as those from the Elizabethan era, what was that about? I think those served the same purpose as facings in nicer clothing these days:

Lice are known to travel up the inside of our clothing, particularly up seams, which give them more to hold onto as they climb. This allows them to dine as they climb. But lice are dumber than fleas, and so are Morgellons, in this respect. Unlike bump cars, which back up and go around, lice and Morgellons tend, at least mine do, to stop and bite me through the fabric barrier, and both are equipped with the tools to accomplish that.

Cotton, Heat, and What to Treat

October 23, 2011 By: kajay Category: Best Practices, F-Zymes, Morgellons

Heat is good, I use Bill W’s technique in the shower of “ironing” my skin with the water as hot as I can stand.

I had to do this recovery thing backwards because it didn’t work to change everything out in my environment first (multiple times). I am having to get them out of me first, then I will go through the house.

After a few years of being cold and wet all the time (like a dog’s nose) I got sick of it and figured out that if I soaked my cotton sleepwear in ANYTHING for at least 24 hours, then wash normally and dry on high for 4 hours – it’s a hassle, but I have NO problem with cotton sleepwear or casual wear then.

I DO have a problem with acrylic and some polymers, and I once bought two shirts (same shirt, two colors) at TJ Maxx that had bioactive threads. Some of the fabric manufacturers created them to “keep fabric looking nice” (I have the article documenting this in my library, critterfiles. For my work clothes, since I must dress professionally, I get them dry cleaned.